All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘1 samuel’

Sunday Recap for 06.10.18 Big Picture Question: How does your relationship with God radically affect every other relationship?

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Sunday, June 10, 2018, Evident Grace Fellowship looked at 1 Samuel 18:1-16:

1 Samuel 18:1 As soon as he had finished speaking to Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul. 2 And Saul took him that day and would not let him return to his father’s house. 3 Then Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul. 4 And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was on him and gave it to David, and his armor, and even his sword and his bow and his belt. 5 And David went out and was successful wherever Saul sent him, so that Saul set him over the men of war. And this was good in the sight of all the people and also in the sight of Saul’s servants.

6 As they were coming home, when David returned from striking down the Philistine, the women came out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul, with tambourines, with songs of joy, and with musical instruments. 7 And the women sang to one another as they celebrated, “Saul has struck down his thousands, and David his ten thousands.”

8 And Saul was very angry, and this saying displeased him. He said, “They have ascribed to David ten thousands, and to me they have ascribed thousands, and what more can he have but the kingdom?” 9 And Saul eyed David from that day on.

10 The next day a harmful spirit from God rushed upon Saul, and he raved within his house while David was playing the lyre, as he did day by day. Saul had his spear in his hand. 11 And Saul hurled the spear, for he thought, “I will pin David to the wall.” But David evaded him twice.

12 Saul was afraid of David because the Lord was with him but had departed from Saul. 13 So Saul removed him from his presence and made him a commander of a thousand. And he went out and came in before the people. 14 And David had success in all his undertakings, for the Lord was with him. 15 And when Saul saw that he had great success, he stood in fearful awe of him. 16 But all Israel and Judah loved David, for he went out and came in before them.

From that passage, we asked this Big Picture Question:

Big Picture Question:  How does a relationship with God radically change every one of your relationships?

And we found these 3 answers to our Big Picture Question:

Godly Relationships are Based on Unity

Godly Relationships are Covenantal

Godly Relationships Confound Non-believers 

Godly Relationships are Based on Unity

1 Samuel 18:1 As soon as he had finished speaking to Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul. 2 And Saul took him that day and would not let him return to his father’s house.

The unity that David and Jonathan lived out is not meant to be rare.  It is the unity that each believer is supposed to live out in light of the work of Jesus Christ:

Ephesians 4:1-6 1As a prisoner for the LORD, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. 2Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. 3Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. 4There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called; 5one LORD, one faith, one baptism; 6one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all.

This is the wonderful reality that David later sings about it:

Psalm 133:1 1A song of ascents. Of David. How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity!

Godly Relationships are Covenantal

3 Then Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul. 4 And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was on him and gave it to David, and his armor, and even his sword and his bow and his belt. 5 And David went out and was successful wherever Saul sent him, so that Saul set him over the men of war. And this was good in the sight of all the people and also in the sight of Saul’s servants.

David and Jonathan live out a covenantal relationship with each other where each wants the best for the other.  What one feels, the other feels.  What one celebrates, the other celebrates.  Their relationship is a picture of the 1 Corinthians 12 reality of the church as the body of Christ.

Godly Relationships Confound Non-believers 

6 As they were coming home, when David returned from striking down the Philistine, the women came out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul, with tambourines, with songs of joy, and with musical instruments. 7 And the women sang to one another as they celebrated, “Saul has struck down his thousands, and David his ten thousands.”

8 And Saul was very angry, and this saying displeased him. He said, “They have ascribed to David ten thousands, and to me they have ascribed thousands, and what more can he have but the kingdom?” 9 And Saul eyed David from that day on.

10 The next day a harmful spirit from God rushed upon Saul, and he raved within his house while David was playing the lyre, as he did day by day. Saul had his spear in his hand. 11 And Saul hurled the spear, for he thought, “I will pin David to the wall.” But David evaded him twice.

12 Saul was afraid of David because the Lord was with him but had departed from Saul. 13 So Saul removed him from his presence and made him a commander of a thousand. And he went out and came in before the people. 14 And David had success in all his undertakings, for the Lord was with him. 15 And when Saul saw that he had great success, he stood in fearful awe of him. 16 But all Israel and Judah loved David, for he went out and came in before them.

If we live out this unified covenantal relationship with the church, the world will not understand it, just as Saul was confounded by David’s godliness, and ultimately, we will see, his relationship with Johnathan as well.

But this type of relationship that has an effect on the entire world is what we are called to live out in Philippians 2.

Philippians 2: Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. 5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, 6 who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. 9 Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Big Picture Question:  How does a relationship with God radically change every one of your relationships?

Truth:  Christians are intended to live in unified, covenantal relationships that confound the world with a testimony of what a relationship with God is like. 

Action:  Live knowing that your relationships with other Christians are a reflection of your understanding and application of the Gospel.

Application:  Redefine your friendships with other Christians by things that are distinctly and inherently Christian.

Evident Grace Sunday Recap for 06.03.18 – What Opposes the Glory of God?

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Sunday, June 3, 2018, Evident Grace Fellowship looked at 1 Samuel 17:28-58:

1 Samuel 17:28 Now Eliab his eldest brother heard when he spoke to the men. And Eliab’s anger was kindled against David, and he said, “Why have you come down? And with whom have you left those few sheep in the wilderness? I know your presumption and the evil of your heart, for you have come down to see the battle.” 29 And David said, “What have I done now? Was it not but a word?” 30 And he turned away from him toward another, and spoke in the same way, and the people answered him again as before.

31 When the words that David spoke were heard, they repeated them before Saul, and he sent for him. 32 And David said to Saul, “Let no man’s heart fail because of him. Your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.” 33 And Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him, for you are but a youth, and he has been a man of war from his youth.” 34 But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father. And when there came a lion, or a bear, and took a lamb from the flock, 35 I went after him and struck him and delivered it out of his mouth. And if he arose against me, I caught him by his beard and struck him and killed him. 36 Your servant has struck down both lions and bears, and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, for he has defied the armies of the living God.” 37 And David said, “The Lord who delivered me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of this Philistine.” And Saul said to David, “Go, and the Lord be with you!”

38 Then Saul clothed David with his armor. He put a helmet of bronze on his head and clothed him with a coat of mail, 39 and David strapped his sword over his armor. And he tried in vain to go, for he had not tested them. Then David said to Saul, “I cannot go with these, for I have not tested them.” So David put them off. 40 Then he took his staff in his hand and chose five smooth stones from the brook and put them in his shepherd’s pouch. His sling was in his hand, and he approached the Philistine.

41 And the Philistine moved forward and came near to David, with his shield-bearer in front of him. 42 And when the Philistine looked and saw David, he disdained him, for he was but a youth, ruddy and handsome in appearance. 43 And the Philistine said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. 44 The Philistine said to David, “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the field.” 45 Then David said to the Philistine, “You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46 This day the Lord will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you down and cut off your head. And I will give the dead bodies of the host of the Philistines this day to the birds of the air and to the wild beasts of the earth, that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel, 47 and that all this assembly may know that the Lord saves not with sword and spear. For the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give you into our hand.”

48 When the Philistine arose and came and drew near to meet David, David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet the Philistine. 49 And David put his hand in his bag and took out a stone and slung it and struck the Philistine on his forehead. The stone sank into his forehead, and he fell on his face to the ground.

50 So David prevailed over the Philistine with a sling and with a stone, and struck the Philistine and killed him. There was no sword in the hand of David. 51 Then David ran and stood over the Philistine and took his sword and drew it out of its sheath and killed him and cut off his head with it. When the Philistines saw that their champion was dead, they fled. 52 And the men of Israel and Judah rose with a shout and pursued the Philistines as far as Gath and the gates of Ekron, so that the wounded Philistines fell on the way from Shaaraim as far as Gath and Ekron. 53 And the people of Israel came back from chasing the Philistines, and they plundered their camp. 54 And David took the head of the Philistine and brought it to Jerusalem, but he put his armor in his tent

55 As soon as Saul saw David go out against the Philistine, he said to Abner, the commander of the army, “Abner, whose son is this youth?” And Abner said, “As your soul lives, O king, I do not know.” 56 And the king said, “Inquire whose son the boy is.” 57 And as soon as David returned from the striking down of the Philistine, Abner took him, and brought him before Saul with the head of the Philistine in his hand. 58 And Saul said to him, “Whose son are you, young man?” And David answered, “I am the son of your servant Jesse the Bethlehemite.”

We attempted to answer this Big Picture Question:

Big Picture Question:  What opposes the glory of God?

And we found these three answers to our Big Picture Question:

Presumption

Judgment

Doubt

Presumption

1 Samuel 17:28 Now Eliab his eldest brother heard when he spoke to the men. And Eliab’s anger was kindled against David, and he said, “Why have you come down? And with whom have you left those few sheep in the wilderness? I know your presumption and the evil of your heart, for you have come down to see the battle.” 29 And David said, “What have I done now? Was it not but a word?” 30 And he turned away from him toward another, and spoke in the same way, and the people answered him again as before.

David goes onto the battlefield and asks why no one will fight Goliath?  Eliab takes offense to this and presumes that David has an evil intent.  Presume and Assume mean the same thing except presume has more of a degree of certainty.  Presumption is a sin because it flies in the face of 1 Corinthians 2 that tells us that we cannot know the mind of another person, and it is contrary to the Philippians 2 command that we consider others better than ourselves.  This presumption opposes the glory of God.

Judgment

31 When the words that David spoke were heard, they repeated them before Saul, and he sent for him. 32 And David said to Saul, “Let no man’s heart fail because of him. Your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.” 33 And Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him, for you are but a youth, and he has been a man of war from his youth.” 34 But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father. And when there came a lion, or a bear, and took a lamb from the flock, 35 I went after him and struck him and delivered it out of his mouth. And if he arose against me, I caught him by his beard and struck him and killed him. 36 Your servant has struck down both lions and bears, and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, for he has defied the armies of the living God.” 37 And David said, “The Lord who delivered me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of this Philistine.” And Saul said to David, “Go, and the Lord be with you!”

38 Then Saul clothed David with his armor. He put a helmet of bronze on his head and clothed him with a coat of mail, 39 and David strapped his sword over his armor. And he tried in vain to go, for he had not tested them. Then David said to Saul, “I cannot go with these, for I have not tested them.” So David put them off. 40 Then he took his staff in his hand and chose five smooth stones from the brook and put them in his shepherd’s pouch. His sling was in his hand, and he approached the Philistine.

Saul doesn’t think that David can fight Goliath because of his stature and lack of experience.  He also assumes that David needs a ton of armor.  Saul is judging by the outward appearance and doesn’t know David’s heart.  God specifically spoke against this outward judgment when Samuel anointed David.  What Saul does not know is that David is a fierce warrior and a fierce defender of the honor of God.  Whenever we judge others by outward appearances, we fall into Saul’s sin and oppose the glory of God instead of defending it.

Doubt

41 And the Philistine moved forward and came near to David, with his shield-bearer in front of him. 42 And when the Philistine looked and saw David, he disdained him, for he was but a youth, ruddy and handsome in appearance. 43 And the Philistine said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. 44 The Philistine said to David, “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the field.” 45 Then David said to the Philistine, “You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46 This day the Lord will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you down and cut off your head. And I will give the dead bodies of the host of the Philistines this day to the birds of the air and to the wild beasts of the earth, that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel, 47 and that all this assembly may know that the Lord saves not with sword and spear. For the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give you into our hand.”

48 When the Philistine arose and came and drew near to meet David, David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet the Philistine. 49 And David put his hand in his bag and took out a stone and slung it and struck the Philistine on his forehead. The stone sank into his forehead, and he fell on his face to the ground.

50 So David prevailed over the Philistine with a sling and with a stone, and struck the Philistine and killed him. There was no sword in the hand of David. 51 Then David ran and stood over the Philistine and took his sword and drew it out of its sheath and killed him and cut off his head with it. When the Philistines saw that their champion was dead, they fled. 52 And the men of Israel and Judah rose with a shout and pursued the Philistines as far as Gath and the gates of Ekron, so that the wounded Philistines fell on the way from Shaaraim as far as Gath and Ekron. 53 And the people of Israel came back from chasing the Philistines, and they plundered their camp. 54 And David took the head of the Philistine and brought it to Jerusalem, but he put his armor in his tent

55 As soon as Saul saw David go out against the Philistine, he said to Abner, the commander of the army, “Abner, whose son is this youth?” And Abner said, “As your soul lives, O king, I do not know.” 56 And the king said, “Inquire whose son the boy is.” 57 And as soon as David returned from the striking down of the Philistine, Abner took him, and brought him before Saul with the head of the Philistine in his hand. 58 And Saul said to him, “Whose son are you, young man?” And David answered, “I am the son of your servant Jesse the Bethlehemite.”

Goliath doubts that David can fight him so much that he is offended that David would even come onto the field.  By contrast, David has great faith in God.  David fights by faith in the power of God’s name.  He says, “You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied.”

Big Picture Question:  What opposes the glory of God?

Truth:  Presumption and judgment within the body of Christ lead to doubting God and the diminishing of His glory in the church.

Application:   Live knowing that God intends His people to honor and glorify Him by giving one another the judgment of charity and exercising a deep faith in Christ.

Action:  Defend the honor of God this week by telling someone your testimony.

Evident Grace Sunday Recap for 05/27/18 – Defending the Honor of God

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1 Samuel 17:1 Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle. And they were gathered at Socoh, which belongs to Judah, and encamped between Socoh and Azekah, in Ephes-dammim. 2 And Saul and the men of Israel were gathered, and encamped in the Valley of Elah, and drew up in line of battle against the Philistines. 3 And the Philistines stood on the mountain on the one side, and Israel stood on the mountain on the other side, with a valley between them. 4 And there came out from the camp of the Philistines a champion named Goliath of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span. 5 He had a helmet of bronze on his head, and he was armed with a coat of mail, and the weight of the coat was five thousand shekels of bronze. 6 And he had bronze armor on his legs, and a javelin of bronze slung between his shoulders. 7 The shaft of his spear was like a weaver’s beam, and his spear’s head weighed six hundred shekels of iron. And his shield-bearer went before him.

 

8 He stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, “Why have you come out to draw up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not servants of Saul? Choose a man for yourselves, and let him come down to me. 9 If he is able to fight with me and kill me, then we will be your servants. But if I prevail against him and kill him, then you shall be our servants and serve us.” 10 And the Philistine said, “I defy the ranks of Israel this day. Give me a man, that we may fight together.” 11 When Saul and all Israel heard these words of the Philistine, they were dismayed and greatly afraid.

 

12 Now David was the son of an Ephrathite of Bethlehem in Judah, named Jesse, who had eight sons. In the days of Saul the man was already old and advanced in years. 13 The three oldest sons of Jesse had followed Saul to the battle. And the names of his three sons who went to the battle were Eliab the firstborn, and next to him Abinadab, and the third Shammah. 14 David was the youngest. The three eldest followed Saul, 15 but David went back and forth from Saul to feed his father’s sheep at Bethlehem. 16 For forty days the Philistine came forward and took his stand, morning and evening.  17 And Jesse said to David his son, “Take for your brothers an ephah of this parched grain, and these ten loaves, and carry them quickly to the camp to your brothers. 18 Also take these ten cheeses to the commander of their thousand. See if your brothers are well, and bring some token from them.”

 

19 Now Saul and they and all the men of Israel were in the Valley of Elah, fighting with the Philistines. 20 And David rose early in the morning and left the sheep with a keeper and took the provisions and went, as Jesse had commanded him. And he came to the encampment as the host was going out to the battle line, shouting the war cry. 21 And Israel and the Philistines drew up for battle, army against army. 22 And David left the things in charge of the keeper of the baggage and ran to the ranks and went and greeted his brothers. 23 As he talked with them, behold, the champion, the Philistine of Gath, Goliath by name, came up out of the ranks of the Philistines and spoke the same words as before. And David heard him. 24 All the men of Israel, when they saw the man, fled from him and were much afraid. 25 And the men of Israel said, “Have you seen this man who has come up? Surely he has come up to defy Israel. And the king will enrich the man who kills him with great riches and will give him his daughter and make his father’s house free in Israel.” 26 And David said to the men who stood by him, “What shall be done for the man who kills this Philistine and takes away the reproach from Israel? For who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should defy the armies of the living God?” 27 And the people answered him in the same way, “So shall it be done to the man who kills him.”

3 Rules when preaching on David and Goliath

 

  • Don’t Spiritualize.
  • Don’t be cute or original
  • Be faithful to text

 

This passage does the exact opposite of most readings.  This text is not about overcoming challenges in your life.  Martin Luther called that approach a “Theology of glory” – the glory of self.  No this is about the complete surrender of self.  This is about the world’s hatred of God and His people.  This is about God’s honor and God’s people desperately needing a champion.

 

The story of David and Goliath is really about two forces:

 

  • On one side is sin, death, and this world.
  • And those other side is God’s glory and honor defended and advanced by Jesus Christ

 

I knew a pastor once.  He hit the ground running.  His banner was Jesus and the advancement of the gospel.  But then he was hit with every obstacle.  Everything from financial hardships, to persecution, to personal health, to even conflicts the church happened.  The pastor felt alone, unsupported, unliked, and oppressed.

 

This passage as the only thing that kept him going.   Not because he was David and those issues were Goliath.  No, this passage better taught him the true conflict in this world.  This passage caused him to love Jesus, God’s champion, all the more.  And this passage showed him where he was called to defend God’s honor.

 

Hopefully, we can all embrace those truths with this Big Idea.

 

Big Idea:  God’s Champion and Your Part in the Fight.

 

There is a War Between the World and God’s People

The World Demands a Response

The People of God are Called to Defend His honor

 

There is a War Between the World and God’s People

 

1 Samuel 17:1 Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle. And they were gathered at Socoh, which belongs to Judah, and encamped between Socoh and Azekah, in Ephes-dammim. 2 And Saul and the men of Israel were gathered, and encamped in the Valley of Elah, and drew up in line of battle against the Philistines.

 

Philistines are a constant nuisance and danger to the people of God.  Why is that? The Philistines were an ancient people, listed in the records of those who descended from Noah’s son Ham after the time of the flood (Genesis 10:14).  But it was during the time of the Exodus that the Lord promised that the land of Israel would include the territory of the Philistines (Exodus 23:31); this promise meant that some kind of conflict would have to take place for Israel to displace the Philistines.  When Joshua was old, he mentioned the land of the Philistines as one of the areas that still remained to be defeated by Israel (Joshua 13:1–3). Because the Philistines were not completely removed, Israel faced them as perennial enemies.

 

So, in 1 Samuel, we see the Philistines conflict almost as constant.

 

  • 1 Samuel 4 they defeated the people of God. Israel brought out the ark, and Israel was decimated.
  • 1 Samuel 7, the people of God defeated the Philistines. “The LORD thundered loudly against the Philistines that day and threw them into such confusion that they fled before Israel” (7:10)
  • 1 Samuel 13, this is when the Philistines defeat Israel. Saul asks Samuel to offer a sacrifice.  When it takes Samuel 7 days to get there, Saul offers an unbiblical sacrifice.
  • 1 Samuel 14, Saul’s son, Jonathan defeats the Philistine’s, but because Saul said no one was allowed to eat until the Philistines were defeated, the whole battle falls apart and Philistines are not entirely wiped out.

 

So here we are again.  The Philistines hate the people of God.

 

3 And the Philistines stood on the mountain on the one side, and Israel stood on the mountain on the other side, with a valley between them. 4 And there came out from the camp of the Philistines a champion named Goliath of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span. 5 He had a helmet of bronze on his head, and he was armed with a coat of mail, and the weight of the coat was five thousand shekels of bronze. 6 And he had bronze armor on his legs, and a javelin of bronze slung between his shoulders. 7 The shaft of his spear was like a weaver’s beam, and his spear’s head weighed six hundred shekels of iron. And his shield-bearer went before him.

 

This is an issue of military high ground. Why fight it out one on one?  “If the enemy is in range, so are you – Infantry Journal” So, the Philistines say, “Let’s just fight this out one on one.

 

And they bring out their champion, Goliath who is somewhere between 6’9” feet and 9 feet. This may seem ridiculous to us, but imagine the short players from the Jerry West era of the NBA staring at 7’ 1” Shaq. Generally short than most Americans, the real comparison would be something like 5’3” Muggsy Bogues staring up at 7’7” Gheorghe Mureșan

 

And not only Goliath a physical menace, he is decked out in weapons and armor.  He has a helmet of brass, coat of mail (snake), a greaves of brass on his legs, a target of brass on his back, and a spear. On top of that, he had another guy just to carry his shield for him and that guy went ahead of him.

 

8 He stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, “Why have you come out to draw up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not servants of Saul? Choose a man for yourselves, and let him come down to me. 9 If he is able to fight with me and kill me, then we will be your servants. But if I prevail against him and kill him, then you shall be our servants and serve us.” 10 And the Philistine said, “I defy the ranks of Israel this day. Give me a man, that we may fight together.” 11 When Saul and all Israel heard these words of the Philistine, they were dismayed and greatly afraid.

 

Goliath mocks God and the people of God? Am I not a Philistine?  Aren’t you the servant of Saul? Saul was head and shoulders above everyone. Tell you what, why don’t you pick one guy, any guy you want, the biggest dude you got, the fastest dude you got. We can do this any way you want.  MMA, Brazilian ju jitzu, Judo, muy thai. Just bring him on out, and we can throw a little of the sweet science around, and may the best man win.

 

The basis of the conflict between Israel and the Philistines is that Israel advanced into Philistine territory and took their land and that conflict always goes back and forth. So now in the New Testament we don’t live in the context of taking physical property on behalf the kingdom of God. But in the New Testament context in the light of Jesus in the arrival of the kingdom of God that he brings there still is territory for the Christian to take it is only spiritual. That means that you are constantly called to advance and take spiritual territory for the kingdom of God in this world and that means that if you live that out you will be constantly hated by the world.  If your expression of Christianity in the proclaiming of Jesus Christ is not putting you in some conflict with the world that is the equivalent of an Israelite soldier who just doesn’t go into battle.  It doesn’t mean that the world doesn’t hate you it just means that the world can’t distinguish you as a representative of the kingdom of God

 

The World Demands a Response

 

12 Now David was the son of an Ephrathite of Bethlehem in Judah, named Jesse, who had eight sons. In the days of Saul the man was already old and advanced in years. 13 The three oldest sons of Jesse had followed Saul to the battle. And the names of his three sons who went to the battle were Eliab the firstborn, and next to him Abinadab, and the third Shammah. 14 David was the youngest. The three eldest followed Saul, 15 but David went back and forth from Saul to feed his father’s sheep at Bethlehem. 16 For forty days the Philistine came forward and took his stand, morning and evening.

 

Happy to be numbered among the people of God.  Not willing to defend His honor. Happy perhaps even to proclaim themselves as an Israelite.  Not willing to put themselves in danger or harm’s way. I defy the ranks of Israel I dare you to stand up and act like a believer in God. You don’t have the guts. Passivity is not activity. The world is practically daring Christians to stand up and act like Christians.

 

The People of God are Called to Defend His honor

 

17 And Jesse said to David his son, “Take for your brothers an ephah of this parched grain, and these ten loaves, and carry them quickly to the camp to your brothers. 18 Also take these ten cheeses to the commander of their thousand. See if your brothers are well, and bring some token from them.”

 

19 Now Saul and they and all the men of Israel were in the Valley of Elah, fighting with the Philistines. 20 And David rose early in the morning and left the sheep with a keeper and took the provisions and went, as Jesse had commanded him. And he came to the encampment as the host was going out to the battle line, shouting the war cry. 21 And Israel and the Philistines drew up for battle, army against army. 22 And David left the things in charge of the keeper of the baggage and ran to the ranks and went and greeted his brothers. 23 As he talked with them, behold, the champion, the Philistine of Gath, Goliath by name, came up out of the ranks of the Philistines and spoke the same words as before. And David heard him.

 

The earthly champion of God’s people stand to fight GoliathHe heard.  He cares more about the honor of God than he does his reputation or his safety. Defying the people of God, even if they are cowards, is defying the living God Himself.

 

24 All the men of Israel, when they saw the man, fled from him and were much afraid. 25 And the men of Israel said, “Have you seen this man who has come up? Surely he has come up to defy Israel. And the king will enrich the man who kills him with great riches and will give him his daughter and make his father’s house free in Israel.” 26 And David said to the men who stood by him, “What shall be done for the man who kills this Philistine and takes away the reproach from Israel? For who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should defy the armies of the living God?” 27 And the people answered him in the same way, “So shall it be done to the man who kills him.”

 

There has got to be someone who cares about the honor of God? The one who does will be rich. Their thought process is something like this, “We love Godly people who stand up against evil.  In fact, I really this really bold guy who has a podcast. It would be great if someone like that stood of God and his honor…but no me.”

 

So, David asks, “Who is this uncircumcised Philistine to defy the armies of the living God.” David is defending a bunch of spineless weak people. It is wonderfully popular, smug, and self-righteous to beat up Christians right now. And you know what?  And we give so much ammunition to our enemies. In the past two years alone, the church has shown itself to be racist, populists, misogynists, and a people unwilling to defend the helpless and abused.  Our voices rain down with so many others.

 

But we are called to defend the honor of God and the people of God.

 

Below is adapted from unknown author…

 

So, first and foremost, we are not David. We are the Israelites who are cowering in fear in the corner because we can’t face the giant on our own. We can’t beat our enemies on our own. So, we need a David to stand in our place and to defeat our enemies.  But then what happens after that?  David slings the rock that crushed the enemy’s head.  Then, David takes his sword and cuts his head off.  Their enemies run. The Israelite army pursues.

 

That’s how we preach that. You can face your enemies and you have the courage to face your enemies, but you only do that once you recognize, as Jerry Vines says, we don’t fight for victory in the Christian life we fight from victory.  So, it’s a picture of sanctification, but a sanctification that is based in what Jesus has done in saving us.”

 

Big Idea:  God’s Champion and Your Part in the Fight.

 

Big Idea:  Christ ends the world’s hostility with God through the cross & the ongoing proclamation of the Gospel by His people.

 

Application:  Live knowing that Christ ended the enmity between the world, Satan, your sin, and God.

 

Action:  Boldly proclaim Christ by name, not for victory, but out of victory this week. 

 

Evident Grace Sunday Recap from 05.20.18 Big Picture Question: What does God use to accomplish His will?

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Sunday, May 20, 2018, Evident Grace Fellowship looked at 1 Samuel 16:14-23:

1 Samuel 16:14 Now the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the Lord tormented him. 15 And Saul’s servants said to him, “Behold now, a harmful spirit from God is tormenting you. 16 Let our lord now command your servants who are before you to seek out a man who is skillful in playing the lyre, and when the harmful spirit from God is upon you, he will play it, and you will be well.” 17 So Saul said to his servants, “Provide for me a man who can play well and bring him to me.” 18 One of the young men answered, “Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, who is skillful in playing, a man of valor, a man of war, prudent in speech, and a man of good presence, and the Lord is with him.” 19 Therefore Saul sent messengers to Jesse and said, “Send me David your son, who is with the sheep.” 20 And Jesse took a donkey laden with bread and a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them by David his son to Saul. 21 And David came to Saul and entered his service. And Saul loved him greatly, and he became his armor-bearer. 22 And Saul sent to Jesse, saying, “Let David remain in my service, for he has found favor in my sight.” 23 And whenever the harmful spirit from God was upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand. So Saul was refreshed and was well, and the harmful spirit departed from him.

From those scriptures, we attempted to answer this Big Picture Question:

Big Picture Question:  What does God use to accomplish His will?

And we found these three answers:

God uses evil.

God uses providence

God uses the gifting of His people

Let’s look at our first point.

God uses evil.

1 Samuel 16:14 Now the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the Lord tormented him. 15 And Saul’s servants said to him, “Behold now, a harmful spirit from God is tormenting you.

God will use all things to bring about His will, even evil itself.  Satan and God are not in a battle.  God battles no one.  He is the sovereign ruler of all things, and all things serve His purposes.  Here is a brief example of how evil, specifically demonic forces, interact with Jesus.

  • The demons know that Jesus has come to earth from heaven to judge them (Rev 19:15)
  • Jesus has come to destroy the kingdom of darkness (Gen 3:15, Rom 16:20)
  • Jesus has disarmed the demonic order of their power (Col 2:15)
  • Jesus has set the captives free from sin and death (Rom 6:23, Rom 8:2).
  • The demons call Jesus the “Son of God” a clear declaration of Jesus’ divinity (Matt 26:63-64; John 5:17ff; 10:33-36). The demons recognize Jesus as the “Holy One of God” which is always a reference to God almighty
  • Ultimately, God will punish Satan and his demons by casting, Satan, demons, and all of hell into the Lake of Fire (Revelation 20:10).

God uses providence

16 Let our lord now command your servants who are before you to seek out a man who is skillful in playing the lyre, and when the harmful spirit from God is upon you, he will play it, and you will be well.” 17 So Saul said to his servants, “Provide for me a man who can play well and bring him to me.” 18 One of the young men answered, “Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, who is skillful in playing, a man of valor, a man of war, prudent in speech, and a man of good presence, and the Lord is with him.” 19 Therefore Saul sent messengers to Jesse and said, “Send me David your son, who is with the sheep.” 20 And Jesse took a donkey laden with bread and a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them by David his son to Saul. 21 And David came to Saul and entered his service. And Saul loved him greatly, and he became his armor-bearer. 22 And Saul sent to Jesse, saying, “Let David remain in my service, for he has found favor in my sight.”  

God specifically orders all things to bring about His will.  Though David is set apart to be king, very few people know who he is.  By bringing David into the work of Saul, David will gain stature and respect among the people.  Here, God is providentially ordering all of these circumstances both to begin judgment on Saul and to bring about David’s reign.

What is exactly providence?  Here are two definitions:

Westminster 5.1 God, the great Creator of all things, doth uphold, direct dispose, and govern all creatures, actions, and things, from the greatest even to the least, by his most wise and holy providence, according to his infallible foreknowledge, and the free and immutable counsel of his own will, to the praise of the glory of his wisdom, power, justice, goodness, and mercy.

Providence is the means by which God directs all things — both animate and inanimate, seen and unseen, good and evil — toward a worthy purpose, which means His will must finally prevail. (Unknown)

God uses the gifting of His people

23 And whenever the harmful spirit from God was upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand. So Saul was refreshed and was well, and the harmful spirit departed from him.

God has gifted each one of His children with specific talents for the use and advancement of the kingdom.  David couldn’t have known that while he spent hours playing the lyre while tending sheep, that God was preparing him to serve Saul and ultimately be king himself one day

Big Picture Question:  What does God use to accomplish His will?

Truth:  All things serve God’s will, including evil, His people, and their gifting, for the ultimate purpose of His glory and His people’s good.

Action:  Live knowing that at no point and time have you frustrated or stopped the will of God. 

Application:  Pray for an enabling faith to both do God’s will and walk in grace when you feel you failed. 

 

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