All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘providence’

Sunday Recap for 6.24.18 Big Idea: Every Knee Shall Bow and Every Tongue Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord

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Sunday, June 24, 2018, Evident Grace Fellowship looked at 1 Samuel 19:

1 Samuel 19:1 And Saul spoke to Jonathan his son and to all his servants, that they should kill David. But Jonathan, Saul’s son, delighted much in David. 2 And Jonathan told David, “Saul my father seeks to kill you. Therefore be on your guard in the morning. Stay in a secret place and hide yourself. 3 And I will go out and stand beside my father in the field where you are, and I will speak to my father about you. And if I learn anything I will tell you.” 4 And Jonathan spoke well of David to Saul his father and said to him, “Let not the king sin against his servant David, because he has not sinned against you, and because his deeds have brought good to you. 5 For he took his life in his hand and he struck down the Philistine, and the Lord worked a great salvation for all Israel. You saw it, and rejoiced. Why then will you sin against innocent blood by killing David without cause?” 6 And Saul listened to the voice of Jonathan. Saul swore, “As the Lord lives, he shall not be put to death.” 7 And Jonathan called David, and Jonathan reported to him all these things. And Jonathan brought David to Saul, and he was in his presence as before.

8 And there was war again. And David went out and fought with the Philistines and struck them with a great blow, so that they fled before him. 9 Then a harmful spirit from the Lord came upon Saul, as he sat in his house with his spear in his hand. And David was playing the lyre. 10 And Saul sought to pin David to the wall with the spear, but he eluded Saul, so that he struck the spear into the wall. And David fled and escaped that night.

 

11 Saul sent messengers to David’s house to watch him, that he might kill him in the morning. But Michal, David’s wife, told him, “If you do not escape with your life tonight, tomorrow you will be killed.” 12 So Michal let David down through the window, and he fled away and escaped. 13 Michal took an image[a] and laid it on the bed and put a pillow of goats’ hair at its head and covered it with the clothes. 14 And when Saul sent messengers to take David, she said, “He is sick.” 15 Then Saul sent the messengers to see David, saying, “Bring him up to me in the bed, that I may kill him.” 16 And when the messengers came in, behold, the image was in the bed, with the pillow of goats’ hair at its head. 17 Saul said to Michal, “Why have you deceived me thus and let my enemy go, so that he has escaped?” And Michal answered Saul, “He said to me, ‘Let me go. Why should I kill you?’”

18 Now David fled and escaped, and he came to Samuel at Ramah and told him all that Saul had done to him. And he and Samuel went and lived at Naioth. 19 And it was told Saul, “Behold, David is at Naioth in Ramah.” 20 Then Saul sent messengers to take David, and when they saw the company of the prophets prophesying, and Samuel standing as head over them, the Spirit of God came upon the messengers of Saul, and they also prophesied. 21 When it was told Saul, he sent other messengers, and they also prophesied. And Saul sent messengers again the third time, and they also prophesied. 22 Then he himself went to Ramah and came to the great well that is in Secu. And he asked, “Where are Samuel and David?” And one said, “Behold, they are at Naioth in Ramah.” 23 And he went there to Naioth in Ramah. And the Spirit of God came upon him also, and as he went he prophesied until he came to Naioth in Ramah. 24 And he too stripped off his clothes, and he too prophesied before Samuel and lay naked all that day and all that night. Thus it is said, “Is Saul also among the prophets?”

From that passage, we pursued this Big Idea:

Big Idea:  Every Knee Shall Bow and Every Tongue Shall Confess that Jesus Christ is Lord.

Act I

1 Samuel 19:1 And Saul spoke to Jonathan his son and to all his servants, that they should kill David. But Jonathan, Saul’s son, delighted much in David. 2 And Jonathan told David, “Saul my father seeks to kill you. Therefore be on your guard in the morning. Stay in a secret place and hide yourself. 3 And I will go out and stand beside my father in the field where you are, and I will speak to my father about you. And if I learn anything I will tell you.” 4 And Jonathan spoke well of David to Saul his father and said to him, “Let not the king sin against his servant David, because he has not sinned against you, and because his deeds have brought good to you. 5 For he took his life in his hand and he struck down the Philistine, and the Lord worked a great salvation for all Israel. You saw it, and rejoiced. Why then will you sin against innocent blood by killing David without cause?” 6 And Saul listened to the voice of Jonathan. Saul swore, “As the Lord lives, he shall not be put to death.” 7 And Jonathan called David, and Jonathan reported to him all these things. And Jonathan brought David to Saul, and he was in his presence as before.

8 And there was war again. And David went out and fought with the Philistines and struck them with a great blow, so that they fled before him. 9 Then a harmful spirit from the Lord came upon Saul, as he sat in his house with his spear in his hand. And David was playing the lyre. 10 And Saul sought to pin David to the wall with the spear, but he eluded Saul, so that he struck the spear into the wall. And David fled and escaped that night.

Saul is determined to kill David, but Jonathan, Saul’s son and David’s friend, want to prevent that.  He warns David and reminds Saul of all the good that David has done for the people of God and Saul’s kingdom.  He even tells Saul that it would be a sin for Saul to kill David.  Saul swears that he will not kill David.  However, soon after, Saul is tormented again, and when David plays the lyre to calm him, Saul throws a spear at him, trying to kill him.  David eludes him.  Here we see that God is working to protect David even in the midst of outside and inside attacks.

Act II

11 Saul sent messengers to David’s house to watch him, that he might kill him in the morning. But Michal, David’s wife, told him, “If you do not escape with your life tonight, tomorrow you will be killed.” 12 So Michal let David down through the window, and he fled away and escaped. 13 Michal took an image and laid it on the bed and put a pillow of goats’ hair at its head and covered it with the clothes. 14 And when Saul sent messengers to take David, she said, “He is sick.” 15 Then Saul sent the messengers to see David, saying, “Bring him up to me in the bed, that I may kill him.” 16 And when the messengers came in, behold, the image was in the bed, with the pillow of goats’ hair at its head. 17 Saul said to Michal, “Why have you deceived me thus and let my enemy go, so that he has escaped?” And Michal answered Saul, “He said to me, ‘Let me go. Why should I kill you?’”

Saul continues to hunt David.  While David is at his home, his wife, Michal, realizes that Saul is sending soldiers to kill him.  She sends David away, places an image in their bed, and covers it with goat’s hair.  The soldiers take the bed with the image in it to Saul.  King Saul realizes he has been tricked and is enraged.  God continues to protect David.

Act III

18 Now David fled and escaped, and he came to Samuel at Ramah and told him all that Saul had done to him. And he and Samuel went and lived at Naioth. 19 And it was told Saul, “Behold, David is at Naioth in Ramah.” 20 Then Saul sent messengers to take David, and when they saw the company of the prophets prophesying, and Samuel standing as head over them, the Spirit of God came upon the messengers of Saul, and they also prophesied. 21 When it was told Saul, he sent other messengers, and they also prophesied. And Saul sent messengers again the third time, and they also prophesied. 22 Then he himself went to Ramah and came to the great well that is in Secu. And he asked, “Where are Samuel and David?” And one said, “Behold, they are at Naioth in Ramah.” 23 And he went there to Naioth in Ramah. And the Spirit of God came upon Saul also, and as he went he prophesied until he came to Naioth in Ramah. 24 And he too stripped off his clothes, and he too prophesied before Samuel and lay naked all that day and all that night. Thus it is said, “Is Saul also among the prophets?”

3 times, Saul sends soldier to kill David who is now with Samuel.  Each time the soldiers show up, they start praising God and prophesying.  Finally, Saul goes to kill David, and even he starts prophesying.  Nothing is going to harm David.

This kind of protection was not offered to Jesus.  Jesus, the rightful king of God’s people, was not protected.  Every protection was removed.

The glorious praises he deserves will instead receive blasphemy. Instead of being protected by good friend, he will be deceived by a friend.  Instead of Jesus’ enemies breaking into prophecy, Jesus will be made fun of for prophesying. David is protected and enemies’ words are turned into praises, but Jesus’ enemies punch him and mock him. David was protected as king of the Jews.  Jesus is mocked for being king of the Jews.

How then do we live in light of these truths?

Philippians 2: 4 Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. 5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, 6 who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. 8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. 9 Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Philippians tells us 3 ways to live that out.

14 Do all things without grumbling or disputing, 15 that you may be blameless and innocent, children of God without blemish in the midst of a crooked and twisted generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world,

 16 holding fast to the word of life, so that in the day of Christ I may be proud that I did not run in vain or labor in vain. 17 Even if I am to be poured out as a drink offering upon the sacrificial offering of your faith, I am glad and rejoice with you all. 18  Likewise, you also should be glad and rejoice with me.

Truth:  God will use everything in existence, every person, every circumstance, and every action to ultimately bring Him glory.

Application:  Live knowing that Christ worked specifically to redeem each moment of your life, making them God-glorifying and personally transformational experiences.

Action: Imitate Jesus’ humility this week by not complaining, folding fast to the words of God, and rejoicing.

Evident Grace Sunday Recap from 05.20.18 Big Picture Question: What does God use to accomplish His will?

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Sunday, May 20, 2018, Evident Grace Fellowship looked at 1 Samuel 16:14-23:

1 Samuel 16:14 Now the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the Lord tormented him. 15 And Saul’s servants said to him, “Behold now, a harmful spirit from God is tormenting you. 16 Let our lord now command your servants who are before you to seek out a man who is skillful in playing the lyre, and when the harmful spirit from God is upon you, he will play it, and you will be well.” 17 So Saul said to his servants, “Provide for me a man who can play well and bring him to me.” 18 One of the young men answered, “Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, who is skillful in playing, a man of valor, a man of war, prudent in speech, and a man of good presence, and the Lord is with him.” 19 Therefore Saul sent messengers to Jesse and said, “Send me David your son, who is with the sheep.” 20 And Jesse took a donkey laden with bread and a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them by David his son to Saul. 21 And David came to Saul and entered his service. And Saul loved him greatly, and he became his armor-bearer. 22 And Saul sent to Jesse, saying, “Let David remain in my service, for he has found favor in my sight.” 23 And whenever the harmful spirit from God was upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand. So Saul was refreshed and was well, and the harmful spirit departed from him.

From those scriptures, we attempted to answer this Big Picture Question:

Big Picture Question:  What does God use to accomplish His will?

And we found these three answers:

God uses evil.

God uses providence

God uses the gifting of His people

Let’s look at our first point.

God uses evil.

1 Samuel 16:14 Now the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the Lord tormented him. 15 And Saul’s servants said to him, “Behold now, a harmful spirit from God is tormenting you.

God will use all things to bring about His will, even evil itself.  Satan and God are not in a battle.  God battles no one.  He is the sovereign ruler of all things, and all things serve His purposes.  Here is a brief example of how evil, specifically demonic forces, interact with Jesus.

  • The demons know that Jesus has come to earth from heaven to judge them (Rev 19:15)
  • Jesus has come to destroy the kingdom of darkness (Gen 3:15, Rom 16:20)
  • Jesus has disarmed the demonic order of their power (Col 2:15)
  • Jesus has set the captives free from sin and death (Rom 6:23, Rom 8:2).
  • The demons call Jesus the “Son of God” a clear declaration of Jesus’ divinity (Matt 26:63-64; John 5:17ff; 10:33-36). The demons recognize Jesus as the “Holy One of God” which is always a reference to God almighty
  • Ultimately, God will punish Satan and his demons by casting, Satan, demons, and all of hell into the Lake of Fire (Revelation 20:10).

God uses providence

16 Let our lord now command your servants who are before you to seek out a man who is skillful in playing the lyre, and when the harmful spirit from God is upon you, he will play it, and you will be well.” 17 So Saul said to his servants, “Provide for me a man who can play well and bring him to me.” 18 One of the young men answered, “Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, who is skillful in playing, a man of valor, a man of war, prudent in speech, and a man of good presence, and the Lord is with him.” 19 Therefore Saul sent messengers to Jesse and said, “Send me David your son, who is with the sheep.” 20 And Jesse took a donkey laden with bread and a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them by David his son to Saul. 21 And David came to Saul and entered his service. And Saul loved him greatly, and he became his armor-bearer. 22 And Saul sent to Jesse, saying, “Let David remain in my service, for he has found favor in my sight.”  

God specifically orders all things to bring about His will.  Though David is set apart to be king, very few people know who he is.  By bringing David into the work of Saul, David will gain stature and respect among the people.  Here, God is providentially ordering all of these circumstances both to begin judgment on Saul and to bring about David’s reign.

What is exactly providence?  Here are two definitions:

Westminster 5.1 God, the great Creator of all things, doth uphold, direct dispose, and govern all creatures, actions, and things, from the greatest even to the least, by his most wise and holy providence, according to his infallible foreknowledge, and the free and immutable counsel of his own will, to the praise of the glory of his wisdom, power, justice, goodness, and mercy.

Providence is the means by which God directs all things — both animate and inanimate, seen and unseen, good and evil — toward a worthy purpose, which means His will must finally prevail. (Unknown)

God uses the gifting of His people

23 And whenever the harmful spirit from God was upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand. So Saul was refreshed and was well, and the harmful spirit departed from him.

God has gifted each one of His children with specific talents for the use and advancement of the kingdom.  David couldn’t have known that while he spent hours playing the lyre while tending sheep, that God was preparing him to serve Saul and ultimately be king himself one day

Big Picture Question:  What does God use to accomplish His will?

Truth:  All things serve God’s will, including evil, His people, and their gifting, for the ultimate purpose of His glory and His people’s good.

Action:  Live knowing that at no point and time have you frustrated or stopped the will of God. 

Application:  Pray for an enabling faith to both do God’s will and walk in grace when you feel you failed. 

 

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